Vp Issue 7: “'What’s YOUR Platform?' To be a performance artist"

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Vp Issue 7: “'What’s YOUR Platform?' To be a performance artist"

judgment. Close to the bone, Alix is hard-wired with social consciousness. There is no ‘leaving work at the office,’ no slapping a bumper sticker on her car allowing the impetus for its purchase to trail behind. “I have a real responsibility when I pick up a microphone or stand in front of an audience to know what is going on in the world, to read the paper, The Nation, watch television — with note book in hand — and educate myself everyday.”

It is important to live as examples for ourselves [and others]. Alix affirms, “This is what helps me to feel full — what engages my senses.” This trickles down into the mechanics of her work — making it a point to work with feminist womyn, using independent, fair trade, sweatshop-free companies to manufacture her merchandise. “Viewing politics in the musty historical way - contemplating who said ‘fuck you’ to the pharaoh first — is incredibly romantic.” She clarifies, that she is not referring to the modern-day, bullshit politics of power, but the whole being a sum of its parts and the parts being a product of the collective — the conflict and the harmony of living in a micro and macrocosm simultaneously. “The sociological aspect of politics is sexy.” Humor and a small group of inspiring friends keep Alix focused and grounded. “I enjoy performing most when my audience is small. It enables me to interact and facilitate warmth and community, to participate in a group of individuals coming together just to laugh, lament, share an experience of the absurdity of our culture, together.”

Joy is a key ingredient in her life. “The only aspect of our community which truly angers me is womyn engaging in speech and action against other womyn.” Alix looks me square in the face, “Tell me, Jen, how can we do it? How can we open a dialogue between womyn? Why is there such divisiveness is our community?” Many of us as womyn, as lesbians, have worked incredibly hard to ‘get where we are’ in this ever-changing fluidity of work, gender politics, sexuality, identity. Alix is no exception. It is a constant struggle against insecurity to find self-validation for the very important work that she does. “Why aren’t there social workers on the covers of our magazines?” she asks. “There are so many vital activist careers out there that are not put in the